Washington State Registry of Interpreters for the Deaf

Conference Workshops

Information & Pictures Pending... Please check back!

THURSDAY — October 3

7:00 – 9:00 PM

KEYNOTE

Presenter: TBD  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: 


FRIDAY — October 4

9:00 – NOON

Moving with Curiosity: Exploring Identity Within Systems of Power & Oppression (Part 1)

Presenter: Jonathan Webb  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: This workshop capitalizes on interpreters that view themselves as agents of social justice and a medium for equity. While increasingly more interpreters are finding themselves passionate about issues relating to justice, many do not know how to translate these thoughts and feelings into not only doable actions, but conscious action. Participants will explore both “self” and “other” within the context of power, privilege, and oppression. Participants should understand that involvement in the training will assist interpreters and others engaged with the Deaf Community in getting honest around the issues of inequity and how we can appropriately stand as both ally and friend to a community that has given us so much. An attitude of openness, cultural humility, and courage will be needed and welcomed.  


9:00 – NOON

Translation and Inclusion of Socio-cultural Perspective (Part 1)

Presenter: Eileen Forestal  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: 


9:00 – NOON

Navigating State Systems for Work and ACCESS Access

Presenters: Berle Ross & Deborah O'Willow  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: Panel discussion to review 3 to 4 different contract options that impact how Deaf people request services. Panel will include representatives from AOC -WA Courts and Department of Labor and Industry. 


3:00 – 6:00 PM

Moving with Curiosity: Exploring Identity Within Systems of Power & Oppression (Part 2)

Presenter: Jonathan Webb  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: This workshop capitalizes on interpreters that view themselves as agents of social justice and a medium for equity. While increasingly more interpreters are finding themselves passionate about issues relating to justice, many do not know how to translate these thoughts and feelings into not only doable actions, but conscious action. Participants will explore both “self” and “other” within the context of power, privilege, and oppression. Participants should understand that involvement in the training will assist interpreters and others engaged with the Deaf Community in getting honest around the issues of inequity and how we can appropriately stand as both ally and friend to a community that has given us so much. An attitude of openness, cultural humility, and courage will be needed and welcomed. 


3:00 – 6:00 PM

Translation and Inclusion of Socio-cultural Perspective (Part 2)

Presenter: Eileen Forestal  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: 

Video Description


3:00 – 6:00 PM

The Legislative Process and How it Benefits Our Community

Presenter: "Dino" Christianson  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: This workshop will present information about Washington State politics and the legislative process. We will discuss pertinent vocabulary definitions and real-life examples of how the Deaf community has influenced the political process. Topics will also include how community members can make informed decisions and how interpreters can act as allies throughout the process. 

Video Description

* Deaf Community Emphasis



SATURDAY — October 5

9:00 – NOON

Community Accountability

Presenter: Ellie Savidge  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: The Deaf, DeafBlind, and interpreting communities are always changing. How can we evolve, but maintain a healthy, connected community? In this workshop, we will discuss how our actions in these communities can have an impact that is different than we intended. We will also consider our accountability to ourselves and to the community. We will discuss how to have healthy discussions and maintain community accountability on social media, as well as how to be supportive of other community members… even if we disagree. Participants will be challenged to become more aware of the intent and impact of their actions. 


2:30 – 4:00 PM

Sign Less, Mean More

Presenter: Shawn Broderick & Paul Bert  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: 

Video Description

* Educational Interpreter Emphasis


2:30 – 5:30 PM

Making Words and Actions Matter: Epistemic Justice and Interpreting

Presenter: Naomi Sheneman & Octavian Robinson  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: The concept of epistemic justice and its place in sign language interpreting discourse helps us understand how schisms emerged among professional sign language interpreters and the Deaf communities they serve. Among the consequences of such schisms has been the erasure of deaf epistemologies and ontologies in interpreter education, research, and professional discourse. This erasure and the dominance of non-deaf people in interpreting perpetuates a form of epistemological injustice while promoting gaps in equity literacy for sign language interpreters. We explore this notion of epistemic justice and its meaning in sign language interpreting. Gayarti Spivak defined epistemic violence as active efforts to obstruct and undermine non-dominant knowledge as a means of “Othering.” An examination of the interpreting field through the lens of Spivak’s epistemic violence reveals widespread resistance to feedback from deaf people, marginalization of deaf perspectives in sign language interpreting, and posturing where non-deaf people exhibit defensiveness when deaf people address hearing privilege or structural inequities. Epistemic injustice is both personal and structural. Deaf people experience this form of injustice in indirect, subtle, and implicit ways. We discuss examples of epistemic injustice that occurs in day-to-day encounters between deaf and non-deaf people with the goal that our audience can identify and resist recurrences of this type of injustice. Key to resisting epistemic injustice is to embrace vulnerability. In contemporary social justice dialogue, vulnerability is a key ingredient. In encouraging vulnerability, we consider critical concepts of deaf heart, ally, and accomplice. In the context of epistemic justice, what do those terms really mean? What does it mean to be vulnerable in order to dismantle existing personal forms of oppression such as microaggressions and divesture? Finally, we consider the ways in which this works toward closer relationships between deaf people and non-deaf interpreters.  

Video Descriptions


2:30 – 5:30 PM

The Law of Reciprocity

Presenter: aj granda  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: This workshop will focus on the principle of reciprocity and how it influences our sense of community, our social justice work, and the relationship between the Deaf, DeafBlind, and interpreting communities. A brief introduction will be followed by group discussions on autonomy, reciprocity, collectivism, and Pro-tactile. Members of the Deaf community and interpreters are encouraged to attend. 


4:30 – 6:00 PM

Common Core: Resources to Support Classroom Content and Goals of the Educational Interpreter

Presenter: Angie O'Bleness  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: Ever wonder where to go to get more information and knowledge of topics you are interpreting in the classroom? Have you ever been confused about the goals of a lesson or where the teacher was going in the unit? This workshop will briefly cover resources and discuss potential lessons that instructors may be using from the Common Core State Standards. An overview of Common Core will be discussed including a variety of grade level topics and subjects. Participants will also receive resources for future reference to support interpreter preparation, tutoring, and collegiate collaboration. 

* Educational Interpreter Emphasis 



SUNDAY — October 6

9:00 – NOON

Making Ethical Discussions Matter: Promoting an Open and Honest Dialogue About Ethical Decisions

Presenter: Naomi Sheneman  |  CEUs: TBD

Description: The sign language interpreting profession in the United States has seen several different interpreting models that impose limitations on the actual fluidity of our function as sign language interpreters. Interpreters often have to defend their decisions by emphasizing they had to “step outside their role” to justify their ethical decisions when their decisions were in compliance with the RID-NAD’s Code of Professional Conduct (CPC). The real problem lies with the fact we are still uncomfortable about discussing and justifying our ethical decisions. The CPC’s preamble is based on the concept that interpreters should do no harm but there are conflicting perspectives between the Deaf community and interpreters of what harm entails. Recognition of your own positionality in an interpreted event is key as it is your unique extralinguistic knowledge, which includes morals and values that influence how you make your ethical decisions. There are some tools that guide us through those decisions that are appropriate to the situation and the consumers involved. The ultimate question is how you proceed with the decision-making process that may impact the Deaf consumers’ experience. It is essential to have an open, honest dialogue with Deaf consumers about ethical decisions to gain their perspective. The same is true for interpreter colleagues to making conversations with each other matter with the aim of minimizing horizontal violence.

Video Description

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